The Kinkajou Bottle Cutter

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New Years Eve is just a day away, and odds are you won't have to look hard to find some empty bottles, so why not set 2014 into a more productive note? Today we're going to be taking a look at something pretty cool that'll help you keep things far more interesting looking, the Kinkajou Bottle Cutter. This is a DIY tool to take your pile of empties and turn them into glasses, hanging light shades, or anything else you can think of.

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Unboxing the Kinkajou
There isn't much to hide with the Kinkajou, what you see is what you get, but it's still a pretty cool tool. At it's most basic level, the Kinkajou allows you to etch glass. The way it's constructed, makes it able to do that with glass bottles perfectly. Inside the packaging, you'll find the Kinkajou Bottle Cutter, sand paper, two plastic rings, and a little crowbar of sorts to help snap off some edges in-case the glass doesn't make a clean break.

Everything feels pretty well made. The Kinkajou has a plastic body, but feels completely solid. It has two adjustable clamps mounted into the Kinkajou body as well. The design isn't overly complex, but it is built perfectly for the job.

Some first hand experience
I've never cut glass or done any glass work before, but I've seen a lot of people online who have made their own sets of glasses from wine bottles or larger beer bottles and always thought it looked really cool. Having finally tried this out, it was really simple to do. The way the Kinkajou works is, it'll etch a circle around your bottle. Then applying hot and cold water will cause the bottle to break under the stress, and the break should follow your etched line.

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I attempted this 8 times, all with success. You need to take your time on the etch to get it lined up once you come around. After applying the hot and cold water, I got really clean cuts each time. The edges are sharp, naturally, but they do provide you with some sand paper to smooth those down. I haven't tried it yet, but if you have a dremel or any other rotary tool on hand, that might provide an even faster solution to smoothing down your etches.

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My Conclusion
I really like the Kinkajou. It makes this process into a very simple one, and the results were really clean cuts. It includes two rubber rings for the hot and cold water that should help keep the exposure down to a minimal area, which will help the cut and the lifetime strength of the glass. I'm an instant fan of the Kinkajou Bottle Cutter, and I'm currently looking for more ways I can put it to use!

Kinkajou

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